r/AskReddit Apr 10 '22 Wholesome 3 Helpful 3

[Serious] What crisis is coming in the next 10-15 years that no one seems to be talking about? Serious Replies Only

2.7k Upvotes

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u/Goukaruma Apr 10 '22 edited Apr 10 '22

Fertilizer shortage. Experts know about it. The public not.

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u/GreatStateOfSadness Apr 10 '22

Our local garden supply store in the US just opened up. The owners were remarking how lucky they were to pick up their year's supply just before prices skyrocketed. I doubt most producers have been so lucky.

I reckon the US will be feeling it within the next few months.

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u/Cats-Steal-Things Apr 10 '22

Local farmers have been returning to full-cow poop fertlizing. It stinks here man...

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u/RandomlyMethodical Apr 11 '22

There was a piece on NPR about processing city sewage into fertilizer for farms as well. There’s a lot more involved because people flush things they shouldn’t, but still seemed very promising as a good source of fertilizer and a bit of income for cities.

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u/smellinsalts Apr 11 '22

My town processes it and makes it available for people to buy. I have friends that use it every year and there gardens are amazing. We call it MANure

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u/4oclockinthemorning Apr 10 '22

And where we will turn when the supplies dry up - I worry people will say fuck the long-term climate and ecosystem damage and start taking peat. More than they already are taking peat :(

It seems to me like we have to revolutionise what we do with our sewage, is there any other option?

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u/Goukaruma Apr 10 '22 edited Apr 11 '22

In human feces are many chemicals because we eat medicine like candy. You don't want that on a field.

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u/[deleted] Apr 11 '22 Wholesome

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u/Trirefringent Apr 10 '22

I thought fertilizer was produced in massive industrial quantities. Why would there be a shortage?

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u/LoserScientist Apr 10 '22

We are slowly running low of phosphorus and also the costs of producing ammonia nitrogen are increasing together with natural gas costs. Also Russia is major supplier of many necessary components. Its becoming more and more costly to produce it and farmers can barely afford it anymore. So companies choose not to produce it and switch to other products.

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u/cheesesandsneezes Apr 10 '22

Have a look at what's happening in Sri Lanka.

They banned imports of fertiliser in a bid to boost their economy and it has not gone well.

https://www.reuters.com/markets/commodities/fertiliser-ban-decimates-sri-lankan-crops-government-popularity-ebbs-2022-03-03/

The country is on the brink of collapse at the moment.

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u/LoserScientist Apr 10 '22

Ja if the soils are poor and used wrong, you cannot get any decent yields without fertilizers. And now we also have war in country that holds what, 25% of worlds most fertile soils. Cool cool cool cool cool

On the other hand, you can achieve some improvemwnt if you use genetic editing to change certain properties of plants so they can grow better with less. However, people often cannot understand what gmo means and that its not all bad (see golden rice for example) and protest against it.

So i hope we wont be double fucked - no fertilizer and no funding for scientists to develop alternatives.

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u/Led_Halen Apr 10 '22

Russia suspended fertilizer exports as well from Feb 1st thru beginning of April. That and the Ukraine invasion, among other things, are starting to cause hiccups.

I do not know if Russia has resumed export. Could not find an update on the story.

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u/willowgardener Apr 10 '22

Add to this the fact that topsoil is being rapidly eroded--so the natural supply of nutrients is being depleted as well, meaning the demand for fertilizer will be rising

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u/carelessOpinions Apr 10 '22 edited Apr 10 '22

People who are reaching retirement age without sufficient savings and only having social security income to survive. A person retiring today would need at least $2K/month from savings, investments and pensions for the next 20-25 years in addition to their social security to cover expenses. Most people are not or cannot save enough and don't have pensions plus the solvency of social security is in jeopardy within 12 years. There is nothing currently being done by the government to keep social security solvent or address the other issues of an aging population.

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u/restlessbish Apr 10 '22

This keeps me up at night. Hoping I check out around 65-70. What a sad state of affairs to think you save and save and it still won't be enough.

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u/throneofthornes Apr 10 '22

I saw an article about how they think people could live to 150 in the future. Bitch, on what? 120 year olds grinding it out as Walmart greeters will be the new normal.

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u/BrockDiggles Apr 11 '22

No one working entry level at Walmart will be able to afford what the pharmaceutical life extension companies are going to be charging.

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u/crusafo Apr 10 '22

Not to mention many developed nations in the world now have negative birth rates and aging populations, this puts more and more pressure every year on the younger generations to finance the social security of older generations, when the social security funds have been mismanaged for decades, and are in jeopardy of being depleted. Meanwhile advances in medicine keep extending average lifespans.

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u/Dense-Independent-66 Apr 10 '22

The decline in Krill and phytoplankton in our oceans. If you've never heard of either, just think krill and phytoplankton = bottom of the food chain that ultimately everything else in the ocean connects to.

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u/Demonae Apr 10 '22

70% of the earth's oxygen comes from these, that's the real issue. They die, all oxygen based life on the planet dies.

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u/7h4tguy Apr 10 '22

Hmm, maybe we should start talking about this.

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u/adrenalineseeker10-4 Apr 10 '22

We should have been talking about this for the last 4 decades.the damage has been done already, the amounts of toxins and microplastics in the ocean are already alarmingly high and we have only just begun to see the fallout from our mistakes.

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u/Any_Passenger_9668 Apr 11 '22

Microplastics have been detected in umbilical cords too.

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u/FeatherWorld Apr 11 '22

They've been found in our blood as well. Probably all exposed since childhood and no one knows the ramifications.

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u/Demonae Apr 11 '22

I've been talking about this for over a decade. People go on about global warming, worrying about a one or two c change in temperature. Ocean acidification is what scares the hell out of me. When it starts, it will be a massive and sudden chain reaction.

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u/LGodamus Apr 11 '22

They aren’t unrelated

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u/Crotean Apr 11 '22

Ocean acidification and deoxygenatiaon will eventually kill 99% of life on the planet, but its not a fast process. Its the end game of climate change but it will take a few thousand years. What will happen is mass die off of many species of ocean organisms that can't survive as the water becomes more acidic and warm, IE coral, but this one won't kill us this century. There are other aspects of climate change that will.

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u/[deleted] Apr 10 '22

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u/NobleKale Apr 11 '22

Much of novel research will not hold up to scrutiny and replication. In my undergraduate program of ecology and evolutionary biology, novel is everything. Push the limits of knowledge and what not. It's like scientists & funding sources forgot that replication is a critical priority of research.

Yep. The prioritisation of 'original' research means no one actually goes and fucking checks on the work of others to make sure it... works.

Weeeeee.

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u/Onyx_Rhino Apr 11 '22

I found it so moronic that the replication crisis is really prominent in psychology. But try and publish a replication study that isn't some groundbreaking they were wrong? Nobody cares. In fact I've seen journals explicility state they will not publish replications unless it's a replication of a major idea and shows it being flawed.

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u/nothingbeatagoodshit Apr 10 '22

Water rights.

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u/iamdrinking Apr 10 '22

And the migration associated with not having access to water

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u/APe28Comococo Apr 10 '22

Phoenix and Las Vegas are in for a bad time.

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u/theoutlet Apr 10 '22

Family owns farm land in Arizona. They don’t seem to see an immediate problem

To be fair though. If we run out of water for farming, we have bigger problems

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u/APe28Comococo Apr 10 '22

Uh, for the first time ever water is being restricted for farmers in Arizona because of how low Mead and Powell are. Phoenix and Las Vegas need to get under control growth wise and they really need to get rid of their grass, especially golf courses.

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u/theoutlet Apr 10 '22

Yeah, I know. It’s not looking good. I’m trying to get my family to unload the farmland while it still has value. A lot of people don’t think the water shortage will hit them because historically it never has. Even if all of the science says otherwise

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u/Orange_DipShit Apr 10 '22

The immense power of denial.

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u/lurker-1969 Apr 10 '22

I live in the pacific Northwest and this is HUGE.

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u/MNConcerto Apr 10 '22 edited Apr 10 '22

I live in the great lakes area, waiting for the attempts to pipe the water to desert or tankers to other countries. So far the states bordering the lakes and Canada have held strong with a good treaty.

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u/frostyfruitaffair Apr 10 '22

Natural water resources aren't a part of NAFTA. Canada takes its water rights seriously. Whether it can keep those rights when shit hits the fan is another matter.

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u/remainoftheday Apr 10 '22

oh I fully expect the over developed southwest to eventually have enough temper tantrums that some massive project will be done. population should stabilize (hopefully ) by mid century or so so maybe we can develop better conservation tactics.

given human greed and selfish covetousness I doubt this will happen and they might as well flush the great lakes down the toilet.

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u/mom_with_an_attitude Apr 10 '22

Came here to say exactly this. The western US is drying out. In California, the underground aquifers are being depleted. What's going to happen when they are empty? There is not enough surface water in CA to sustain the population. Arizona is having similar problems: historic drought and Lake Mead's water level dropping. With climate change worsening, the trend of hotter drier weather in the western US is not going to go away. It's only going to get worse.

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u/dharrison21 Apr 10 '22

I feel like there's a reckoning coming in the SouthWest. I grew up there and 25 years ago this was already an issue, and its only grown since. I just cant imagine places like Riverside County or San Berdoo having anywhere near enough water to sustain in even 20 years. Its ALL dryer, every single year, while the places we get water from have more growth between source and SoCal.

The writing is on the wall clear as day.

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u/[deleted] Apr 10 '22

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u/FortressofRain Apr 10 '22

And the water wars that will follow. Also likely accompanied by famine and starvation.

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u/c3ntur1o Apr 10 '22 Starstruck

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u/starx9 Apr 10 '22

Water shortage, as a Canadian I wonder which country will try to take over Canada first for this water?

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u/quicksilverGR Apr 10 '22

Desalination may help fight shortage and maybe fair distribution ( most likely not ).

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u/rastafunion Apr 10 '22

Energy requirements are a problem here.

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u/Crotean Apr 11 '22

Fun fact, gen 3 thorium salt nuclear reactors can also desalinate massive amounts of water. If we hadn't been stupidly ignoring nuclear energy the last 40 years we could have already solved our energy and water needs with them.

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u/LeroyBadBrown Apr 10 '22

Insects dying. There is some talk about it, but it's not a hot topic.

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u/b-monster666 Apr 10 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

I read an article about that, about the windshield phenomenon that no one seems to have really noticed. I started noticing it after I read the article. It wasn't until very long ago, that just driving around, your windshield would constantly be covered in bug guts. Now...not so much.

https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/655338/windshield-phenomenon-why-you-see-fewer-bugs-splattering-cars-today

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u/Born_Salamander_5751 Apr 10 '22

I grew up in south Florida in the 70's, and we had a special bug screen for our car grill to "catch" bugs. It would be covered in no time.

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u/Form84 Apr 10 '22

I'm still of the opinion that this isn't taking into account the increased angularity of windshields now a days. My Ford focus has something like a 40* tilt. My semi truck had a 85* tilted windshield so basically vertical. My focus barely ever gets bugs on it, my semi I have to buy special windshield wiper fluid to clear the bugs off because it's contstantly getting dirty.

Basically, I think the bugs are just bouncing off your standard commuter car now a days because of the aggressive windshield angles.

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u/Apophyx Apr 10 '22 edited Apr 10 '22

The article addresses that. They did a sthdyusinf study using only classic cars, and they found the same decline

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u/[deleted] Apr 10 '22

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u/AmbassadorDull1520 Apr 10 '22

They did a what now?

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u/youstupidcorn Apr 10 '22

My best guess is "study using" but with 2 mistyped letters and a missing space between words.

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u/Apophyx Apr 10 '22 edited Apr 10 '22

Yep, that's exactly it, no idea wtf happened there

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u/Ryoukugan Apr 11 '22

It's terrifying to realize as well. I'm only 30; when I was a kid I swear there were bugs everywhere, all kinds of them too. The area I grew up in was filled with all sorts of things. When I was around 25 or so, I saw a butterfly and I thought it was pretty until I was struck with the thought that it was the first butterfly I could recall seeing in years.

Nighttime used to be a symphony of crickets and frogs; you don't hear either now. There were lightning bugs all over the place in summer as well. I think I must've been 11 or 12 the last time I saw one.

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u/Edirol1018 Apr 10 '22 Silver Helpful

I should not have read these comments.

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u/adbot-01 Apr 10 '22 edited Apr 11 '22

Same here. I have to wake up for my exams in 2 hours, but I CANNOT SLEEP NOW

Edit: didn't sleep a bit. Hope I don't sleep during the exam.

Edit 2: It was computer studies exam today. I did fairly well considering how little/no sleep I got.

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u/bringitonlife Apr 10 '22

I’m here to fuel my existential crisis.

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u/iuytrefdgh436yujhe2 Apr 10 '22

Well, if it is any consolation. Most of the answers in this thread aren't really addressing the '10-15 years' part of the prompt and instead just posting various stuff from /r/collapse that may or may not happen within that time frame. Shit's still pretty bleak, can't really sugarcoat that, but it's not like all of the things in this thread are all equally imminent and about to go down all at once, either, and depending on where you live and your socioeconomic status, you, personally, might barely even notice the effects of many of them even as they do.

It is also fair to address that pretty much every generation believes they are facing imminent, existential collapse of some sort or another but historically we're usually wrong about how these things actually play out more often than we're right about them. Ask someone living a couple years into World War 2 how things are going to go in 10-15 years and the idea that 'the war will end and massive social mobilization will occur leading to relative peace and prosperity and the radical improvement of the average living conditions of billions of people over the next 60 years' would unlikely ever cross their mind as something that was even possible.

Another point that I think is worth mentioning is that we're also historically bad at predicting disruptive technologies and while it's likely too much to hope for 'oh technology will save us!', it is still true that we make incredible advancements across all fields of understanding every year and the ceiling is still likely to be very high for what is possible there.

But yeah, all that isn't necessarily worth much, shit is still bleak, and our specific generational and existential crises genuinely do have unique attributes that make them more severe than historic examples, but at least to the 10-15 years question, we do likely have more time than that at the least and there are still reasons to be hopeful, besides is all.

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u/Zrakoplovvliegtuig Apr 10 '22

Healthcare issues due to plastic pollution. Plasticologists might emerge.

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u/aconfusedcanadien Apr 10 '22

I'm conducting my thesis on microplastics and... god it's frightening as fuck. There's even plastic in the air. You're probably breathing some in rn.

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u/Zrakoplovvliegtuig Apr 10 '22

My studies are in the healthcare field (engineering and policy making) and even among doctors the awareness on plastic ingestion is alarmingly low. If it were only to have a miniscule chance of having carcinogenic effects, the societal effect would be detrimental. We worry about the turtles, when we should already be worried about ourselves.

I also have a question which maybe you could answer. Plastic is ingested mainly via water and food, but what is the effect of plastic containers? I was using the microwave to heat up a meal in a plastic container, and suddenly I was worried that it would drastically increase the plastic content of the food.

Is this something to be worried about, or is plastic consumption already high enough to neglect any potential added plastic from (microwaved) containers.

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u/aconfusedcanadien Apr 10 '22

Most studies I read for my literature review found that plastic containers (both normal and BPA-free) secreted toxins into food/water. Both heat-stressed and unstressed containers did this.

I'm not sure if stressing the plastic containers increases the chance for microplastics to enter the food. I also don't know if using plastic containers and/or heating them significantly increases a person's toxin exposure. My research is more focused on how the plastic particles affect the body rather than how they get there.

... my rule of thumb: stay away from plastics as much as possible.

Also, little side note I thought you would find interesting: one study stated that we know only 8% of the possible chemicals that are secreted, which implies our healthcare system and policies regarding plastics are ... very uninformed. Maybe you could be one of the people that changes that ¯_(ツ)_/¯

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u/archipenko Apr 10 '22

Yeah they discovered micro plastic inside humans lungs for the first time recently

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u/Cats-Steal-Things Apr 10 '22

As an asthmatic this makes me wheeze in terror.

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u/HyperSpaceSurfer Apr 10 '22

Probably just the first time they checked. Microplastics are in the damn rain by this point and I'm not being hyperbolic.

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u/Ryoukugan Apr 11 '22

They're already in placentas and the like as well as I recall. I'd be shocked if anyone on earth isn't filled with them at this point. Maybe isolated tribes in remote regions, and even then I suspect they still have them in their bodies, just to a lesser extent.

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u/RexSueciae Apr 10 '22

Ug99 stem rust. Fungal disease that causes devastating crop failure. Truthfully, things aren't as bad as they looked a few years ago -- there are resistant strains of wheat, although they're not particularly common and most of the wheat currently being grown is not resistant -- but people haven't been talking about it for awhile. This may be a good sign, if the problem is quietly under control and nobody's that worried, but given that the disease is spreading out of east Africa...

I've heard plenty of people talking about how the Russian invasion of Ukraine is doing damage to the supply of wheat (that country produces a lot of wheat, to say nothing of the war's effects on fuel prices and thus transportation costs). What people don't realize is that the global food supply is much more fragile than one might think.

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u/jun-schn Apr 10 '22

After reading this thread for a while "I did not sign to live during the Armageddon, thanks" In a more serious note, it's so sad that most of this stuff was easily preventable.

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u/Schnuckichiru Apr 11 '22

15 years ago I was a teenager and they were teaching us about these oncoming issues back then. I'm genuinely surprised that people are making Pikachu faces when told about it these days.

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u/Crotean Apr 11 '22

This is why im not having kids, birthing them into the collapse of human civilization just seems cruel.

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u/jun-schn Apr 11 '22

Same. I won't be bringing children to a world I can't even guarantee they'll be able to get fresh water of.

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u/Particular-Lecture86 Apr 10 '22

Top Soil Erosion

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u/MrButternuss Apr 10 '22

The world is running out of sand. Yes. Sand.

We need certain sand to build stuff, but that shit is running out. We even excavated entire beaches and filled them back up with Desert Sand. These artificial beaches will degrade much faster and need to be "refilled" every now and then.

And sadly, we cannot use sand from the desert for construction for certain reasons.

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u/crusafo Apr 10 '22

I remember reading that Saudi Arabia imports 100% of its sand from places like Australia for construction projects. The correct grade of sand is a critical ingredient in concrete mixtures which makes up one of the primary building materials in modern construction.

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u/[deleted] Apr 10 '22

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u/poblanojalapeno Apr 11 '22

Sounds like desert sand would make nicer beaches.

Sand exchange!

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u/[deleted] Apr 11 '22

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u/jun-schn Apr 10 '22

Ohh I've heard about this on TikTok from a girl who's turning glass back into sand to later resell it. And that there's a "sand mafia" (might be true might be not this is TikTok info I did not confirm)

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u/MudFootMagoo Apr 10 '22 edited Apr 10 '22

I don’t know tik tok… but this fits what I know to be true so… sand is one of the biggest black market goods and there is a shady element involved in that world… Interestingly enough some of the products i use in tile setting now have replaced sand with ground up glass and other materials. It’s been a problem we’ve seen coming for decades now. I’ve even been called names for saying we need to start growing more trees because the days of endless concrete and glass are almost over…

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u/patricksaurus Apr 10 '22

Everyone knows about global warming. Far fewer people are aware of ocean acidification. It could be absolutely devastating.

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u/LoserScientist Apr 10 '22

They already are. Australia is having coral bleaching episodes more and more often.

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u/deprimeradblomkol Apr 10 '22

Isnt large parts of the great barrier reef already dead?

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u/LoserScientist Apr 10 '22

Exactly. Mostly due to both increasing water temperatures and acidification.

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u/Shadow-Nediah Apr 10 '22

Yes, I suggest it’s name be changed to ‘The Great White Boneyard”

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u/Trirefringent Apr 10 '22

They are one and the same problem though. Both are directly caused by CO2 in the atmosphere.

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u/I_Axel_Phoenix Apr 10 '22

I keep saying water crisis… My bet is on that

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u/Potices Apr 10 '22

Everybody commenting this and mentioning Canada. Can someone get me up to speed?

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u/Squigglepig52 Apr 10 '22

Canada has huge fresh water reserves, and a small population, and not near the need for intensive irrigation measures many other countries have.

So, when, say, the American SW finally goes dry, you know people will want our water.

Just in case, we have a crack legion of beer drinkers and moose ready to piss in every lake and stream in the country.

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u/moonboundshibe Apr 10 '22

And we got squadrons of geese on standby.

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u/anishinaabemay Apr 10 '22

I believe it’s because Canada has 7-20% (couldn’t find a solid number) of the worlds fresh water resources.

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u/Aztecah Apr 10 '22

Topsoil destruction. That's the one I'm most worried about tbh, and I'm pretty sure we're fucked

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u/Representative-Fig96 Apr 10 '22

Answer: Antibiotic resistance.

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u/Known_Grab9482 Apr 10 '22

People talk about this all the time though.

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u/simonDungeon Apr 10 '22

Care to elaborate plz

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u/fuck-my-drag-right Apr 10 '22

Antibiotics work by killing bacteria, this puts selective pressure on the population. Through randomness, a few bacteria will survive the antibiotic. This producing bacteria that are immune to the antibiotic. This cycle repeats until we get super bugs that resist a lot of our medications.

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u/4oclockinthemorning Apr 10 '22

It's not even just us taking too many antibiotics in the human population: they're used so widely in agriculture. Globally about 2/3 of antibiotics are used in farm animals. [Source]

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u/Instant-Noods Apr 10 '22

FDA just passed new regulations to aid in this. In mid 2023, antibiotics must be prescribed by a veterinarian and only on an as-needed than preventative basis. Farmers can no longer make the call themselves. I also believe it was banned in animal feed this year.

That only accounts for the USA however.

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u/ellixxx Apr 10 '22

Fuel and food shortages in the developed world.

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u/yzlautum Apr 10 '22

Def being talked about because of the war in Ukraine. Maybe not 10-15 years from now but they are talking a lot about the future in general.

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u/sanavabic Apr 10 '22

What a great thread...for existential crisis

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u/[deleted] Apr 10 '22

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u/MrWizard311 Apr 10 '22 edited Apr 10 '22

A critical shortage of certain professions. Mainly healthcare and teachers

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u/DolfK Apr 10 '22

It's almost as if nobody wants to do taxing work for mere cents. Here in Finland nurses are on strike, and the government is considering a law that forces nurses to work instead of giving them a raise and hiring more nurses so you can actually take your mandatory breaks.

https://yle.fi/news/3-12391277
https://yle.fi/news/3-12398383

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u/censorized Apr 10 '22

Yup. Heroes don't need money, right?

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u/pajamakitten Apr 10 '22

In the UK, NHS staff got paid in claps during the first lockdown. We were then called ungrateful for asking for a proper pay rise.

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u/Chronically_Quirky Apr 10 '22

You mean to say that you can't pay your rent in claps!?!

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u/who_said_I_am_an_emu Apr 10 '22

Me and my wife were deemed essential in March 2020. Got to say it was a real struggle. Never thought I would be bringing my kids to a chemical plant to hang out in the breakroom while I fixed a dead machine.

They put up a billboard by my home saying thank you to us essential workers. Something about it made it worse. Like you admit what we do is essential but that admission doesn't mean even a small pay rise. Dont thank me next time, sign.

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u/DomingoLee Apr 10 '22

The nursing shortage began many years ago. Covid just exposed what was coming. It’s about to get so much worse.

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u/sociallyvicarious Apr 10 '22

Nursing has devolved to paperwork and less nurse to patient contact while also adding more liability. It’s very sad.

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u/TheRed_Knight Apr 10 '22

Definitely been hearing about that from my friend circle, lotta burnout, shit pay, ridiculous expectations and admin who range from useless too completely out of touch too downright evil.

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u/Angel_OfSolitude Apr 10 '22

I have a lot of family who are teachers, they are fed up with how their district has been treating them.

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u/IwannaBeHappy- Apr 10 '22

Yep, I’m a paramedic and make $18 an hour, with rising cost of living it’s making things very difficult.

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u/Jamie8765 Apr 10 '22

I am a shipping coordinator at a factory and it makes me sad that I make more than you. You SHOULD make more than I do

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u/ecab31 Apr 10 '22

I literally just stock shelves with books at a warehouse and make more than them in a low COL area.. so fucked up

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u/Cats-Steal-Things Apr 10 '22 Shocked

Pretty much anyone with a brain knows health care workers should basically be regarded as rockstars. Many of you young and healthy people reading this post today will one day be on a floor, gasping for breath, and in real risk of dying in the next 10 minutes.

They are the only thing in this existence standing in between you and oblivion on that day. It's not abstract, a LOT of you are going to have that day...

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u/veggiewitch_ Apr 10 '22

Then you have people like me going from healthcare into teaching.

Ah, yes, masochism is strong with me.

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u/jdinpjs Apr 10 '22

True. I’m an RN. I’ve worked for over 20 years and probably could have physically worked another 15 years in direct patient care. I just couldn’t take it anymore. And there are a lot of nurses like me. They’re taking administrative jobs or just leaving nursing altogether. Patients are worse, patients’ families are worse, administrators are way worse. It’s just not worth it anymore.

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u/LetsPlayCanasta Apr 10 '22

The latest projection is that the Social Security Trust Fund will run out around 2034, after which benefits will be cut by 20-25%. Not only will this cause a huge and painful disruption for seniors who depend on SS, it will cause a crisis on confidence among all Americans who paid into this system and won't get back anywhere near what they put into it.

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u/alliownisbroken Apr 10 '22

I dont know if anyone is aware of this, but with the expansion of the internet and social media services, large power sucking data centers need to continuously be built. In america, in certain areas of the country are where they are mostly built now in clusters due to being in close proximity to local offices (Facebook, Amazom, Microsoft,etc). The infrastructure in these areas, particularly the power grid, is becoming too congested to handle the expansion.

Not 100% sure what the impact of it is - but it is coming.

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u/rockmasterflex Apr 10 '22

The actual solution to this is easy: move data centers to unpopulated areas and actually improve their infrastructure so it is business safe to do so.

Right now that just costs more than buying an empty building in an infrastructure-rich location. Eventually it won’t .

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u/Spitzunee Apr 10 '22

Many animal species close to being extinct

There is a porpoise species called the Vaquita in Baja California and there is reportingly nine left

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u/lurker-1969 Apr 10 '22

Worldwide food shortage. It is closer than most believe.

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u/TheRed_Knight Apr 10 '22

With the current conflict the developing worlds gonna get fucked, again

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u/reallyfasteddie Apr 10 '22

My inlaws grow their own. I used to chukle at them. Spend 100s of hours to grow a few hundred dollars worth of food, Not so funny anymore. I cant grow a plant!

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u/daveycakesss Apr 10 '22

On one hand I consider doing it and think it’s a great idea…

On the other hand I think what’s the point because when the time comes someone will just kill me and take it all anyway

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u/Sharkymoto Apr 10 '22

stick a potato in the ground, water depending on where you live, keep the bugs off them, harvest a couple months later. not that hard. growing is the least work, prepping the soil and maintaining a field is. we might find ourselfes in the need to start doing that again sooner or later. i'm in the fortunate position to own enough land to keep the family alive if need be, but not gonna lie, cultivating 100% of your food with your bare hands is a massive amount of work.

might be smart to build an algae culture, those algae offer a lot of nutritional value very fast and they are kinda set up and forget about them things compared to traditional crops/produce

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u/i-hate_it_here Apr 10 '22

Don’t forget learning how to preserve food! A bumper crop is useless if you don’t know how to preserve and store it. I do a reasonable amount of canning and mason jar prices skyrocketed when everyone was at home and picking up every hobby a couple years ago. Then when they had a lid shortage. I had to dry and freeze most my peaches last year because I have a lot of jars but couldn’t get new lids. Also learning how to set up and use a larder is super important.

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u/rangorn Apr 10 '22

Well with the war in Ukraine we are going to experience it sooner then expected.

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u/Phil330 Apr 10 '22

Hedge funds buying up so much of the housing stock. Crisis in affordable housing is going to be on steroids.

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u/Zrakoplovvliegtuig Apr 10 '22 edited Apr 10 '22

Most people will rent. It will be the new normal. "New" of course meaning old if you take into account feudalism.

Some countries are already there (such as in Latin America), with housing costs far exceeding the average wage making it nearly impossible for a renter to ever buy their own house.

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u/ThrowawaySleepingPup Apr 10 '22

We’re going to quickly pass rent being unaffordable as well. I moved into my complex where a 2 bedroom was $1500 4 years ago, it’s now $2200. That’s an insanely high amount for rent. Since we have a law that rent cannot be raised more than 4% a year, I’m scared my complex will decide to not renew our lease so they can get more for our unit.

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u/-ARISTOCATS Apr 10 '22

People will not be able to afford to live. And people in power want it that way for personal gain.

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u/sesnakie Apr 10 '22

Weblive in South Africa. We use to be middle upper class. We still work in our same fields, but are now poor, to the point of struggling to put enough food on the table.

Covid didn't help at all. We both had to take 50% cuts in our salaries. Everything has gotten extremely expensive. Roughly exchanged to $, we nou pay $12 for 1L of vegetable/conola oil.

Nevermind mentioning fuel prices.

We are just extremely glad that our children are all grown up.

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u/[deleted] Apr 10 '22

The 6th mass extinction we as a species are currently ushering in will only get worse as we lose and fight over scarcer and scarcer resources.

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u/Anovale Apr 10 '22

Microplastics being the great filter event we never even realized.

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u/Anxietydepressionadd Apr 10 '22

Bees extinction

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u/Crotean Apr 11 '22

its more then bees, its going to be like 70% of all pollinating insects will be extinct by mid century.

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u/TheRed_Knight Apr 10 '22

The collapse of the public education system in the US

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u/AJEDIWITHNONAME Apr 10 '22

So I should stay teaching in Japan then?

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u/annswertwin Apr 10 '22

The collapse of the US health care system. There wont be enough nurses and doctors (especially nurses) .

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u/PhatBallllzAtHotmail Apr 10 '22

I have this feeling in my gut the housing market will crash again...not because of lending practices but inflation...

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u/Almostsuicide1234 Apr 10 '22

I am in my mid 40s, and was in construction during the lead up to the 08 crisis, and the parallels are building. "THIS time, the housing bubble will be PERMANENT", and related sentiments, for one. In the year leading up to the bust, I remember being on huge development sites advertising "starter homes" at 3x what my house cost 6 years earlier, and construction laborers asking each other "do you know ANYONE who can afford these as a starter home???". Same shit now. My buddy just paid 40% over asking price for a McMansion they can barely afford, the 40 out of pocket. History rhymes.

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u/PhatBallllzAtHotmail Apr 10 '22

Oh I know. I was in construction before entering real estate. It's fuckin scary...at least the first bubble burst was because there were little rules on who and how banks could lend. The biggest farce was bailing them out. No one went to jail, the CEO's got their bonuses...that should've caused riots in the streets but we've become to used to letting it happen and then forgetting because the media focuses on something else.

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u/Antamyst Apr 10 '22

A definite shortage of people with trades, ie, HVAC, plumbing, carpentry you name it. I’m in central NY and right now it’s looking very slim. About 10-15 years ago you could have on call, the numbers of at least a dozen hvac people in business by themselves. Now it’s slim to none.

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u/SekritSawce Apr 10 '22

Not sure my 17 year old son is college bound. I’ve have heard the trades have taken a big hit in recent years. Being in the northeast United States what trade do you think we should get him to consider training in?

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u/Zeketheimpailer Apr 10 '22

Electrical, Plumbing, or HVAC.

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u/Pockets800 Apr 10 '22

I'm in NZ and it's even the same here. My old man is one of the most qualified plumbers in the country and teaches backflow prevention here and in Australia and is on a number of boards, etc, and the one thing he keeps telling us is that the industry is having an extremely hard time recruiting new people.

Part of it is the stigma (with plumbing anyway). People think it's all about toilets and dealing with people's excrement, but another part is that the trade isn't given enough credit by other facilities (like government) to the fact that the vast majority of modern day rests on the back of the most basic forms of plumbing and gasfitting, not to mention the more complex systems. Government(s) actually need to push the trades more. Offering free schooling in them would be a significant booster IMO

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u/Footie_Fan_98 Apr 10 '22

If my Gov offered a free change from my degree to plumbing or electrical, I’d go in a heartbeat

Like, either free training or forgive 50% of my loans in exchange for doing the training and (X) years of work

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u/Drnknnmd Apr 10 '22

Potable water shortage. Especially with the repeal of the clean water act. Water prices are going to spike in the future.

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u/Superjdm69 Apr 10 '22

Helium shortage. We don’t have enough

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u/[deleted] Apr 10 '22

why do we need helium

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u/NightOnFuckMountain Apr 10 '22

Serious answer: MRI machines.

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u/MaxTest86 Apr 10 '22

Correct answer.

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u/DASK Apr 10 '22

The first high(er) temperature superconducting MRI machines are coming online soon (successful design of a 3T machine in 2016). These ones will be 20K, and cooled with liquid hydrogen. There are new, practically scalable and manufacturable, materials that will allow liquid neon MRIs, but those are ~5 years away. We are still reaching for manufacturable non rare earth materials for liquid nitrogen class superconducters... we have materials that would work but which are impractical to manufacture.

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u/888mainfestnow Apr 10 '22

https://azchemistry.com/helium-uses-medicine

Also scuba diving,automotive applications, bar code scanners use a helium gas laser.

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u/SuvenPan Apr 10 '22

Air pollution.

Air pollution is attributed to 11.65% of deaths globally.

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u/dead_trim_mcgee1 Apr 10 '22

European politics is at a crucial point which can cause the break down in continental peace if it goes sour.

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u/OddTicket7 Apr 10 '22

If we continue fishing at this rate the oceans will be functionally dead in 25 years.

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u/stitchmidda2 Apr 10 '22

I can name one that is coming in the next few months. . .the world is about to enter a severe food shortage. With the supply chain already crumbling with the COVID issues, the mass firings and quitting of truckers and factory workers, with countries locking down, with mass riots and looting, with economies collapsing, and now you have Russia being sanctioned which is were a majority of fertilizer comes from. . .crops are gonna fail, prices are going to soar even higher than they already soared. Food will be rationed, poor countries are going to go without anything, rioting and looting will probably get worse when people start to go hungry.

Im telling my family now, stock up. When you go shopping, buy a little big of extra nonperishable stuff and just store it. If you are able to, start gardening. Grow potatoes and carrots in bins. Get fast growing fruit bushes like blueberries and strawberries. Get some backyard chickens for eggs or if you can raise your own chickens for meat then do it. If shit hits the fan you will be glad for this. If I am wrong and this all blows over then hey its not like that food wont get used.

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u/Eldoggomonstro Apr 10 '22

I've been telling anyone that will listen: "Buy an extra giant bag of rice everytime you hit the store."

It keeps well for a long time and will help you stretch your staples.

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u/Plumhawk Apr 10 '22

And dried beans. A mix of rice and beans gives you enough of the eight essential amino acids. Rice alone and you aren't getting enough lysine.

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u/throwawaygreenpaq Apr 10 '22

This is the idea I have but population densities and tiny apartments cripple this greatly. :(

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u/[deleted] Apr 11 '22

After reading this thread, I feel like working 40 hours a week is wasting little time we have left.

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u/Additional_Cry_1904 Apr 10 '22

I think I saw a documentary or something that said sperm whales are probably gonna be extinct by 2030 or some shit.

IDK I was drunk and was like ooo whales.

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u/[deleted] Apr 10 '22 edited 2d ago

[deleted]

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u/Luchin212 Apr 10 '22

Kessler syndrome. Say goodby to anything in a conventional orbit. All your internet satellites are helpless to it. There is nothing that we on earth can do to stop it.

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u/Henry_Day_of_Day_R Apr 10 '22

Explain what Kessler Syndrome is please?

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u/Luchin212 Apr 10 '22 edited Apr 11 '22

Spacejunk collides with other space junk at 17,000+ mph and makes more space junk until there is so much space junk that it forms a ring of unusable space. You can’t have a satellite in there or it will be destroyed. You can’t launch a rocket through that ring because it will be destroyed. The ISS was hit by a 1cm squared fleck of paint that penetrated several inches deep into a window.

Edit: why does this comment have more upvotes than my first comment?

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u/Petachip Apr 10 '22

That's terrifying. Is it even possible to clear that out or would it just cripple our ability to enter space?

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u/green_meklar Apr 10 '22

We might be able to launch puffy 'nets' made of aerogel to capture the debris and bring it back down to Earth faster. Or we might be able to build lasers to vaporize the debris by shooting it from Earth. We haven't really invested much into this technology yet though.

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u/Luchin212 Apr 10 '22

There are tiny satellites called Cube Sats. They just shoot nets and collect junk. And then they deorb it themselves. These will probably never stop it. The best thing is to de orbit all the boosters and stuff that was left behind in the space race. Even if this does happen it till only influence one ring. At one angle. Most rockets are launched from the equator because that makes the math easier. It’s a hassle to explain why. We’d just stop launching at the equator and move North or south. Probably both. It is also worth noting that things orbit at different heights. But it takes more energy and money to get things higher up. That is why most satellites are in Low Earth Orbit at the equator. These satellites are doomed to Kessler. But they can be replaced. It’ll be expensive and time consuming.

With our current state it would make getting to space more difficult but still doable.

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u/bashara836 Apr 10 '22

covid 2 the electric boogolo

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u/Rikamio Apr 10 '22

I read recently that the #3 cause of death (For US) would be suicide by 2030.

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u/ForbiddenHost Apr 10 '22

New illnesses the ice is melting and bacteria that was hibernating for tens of thousands of years is coming back

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u/ClassicCarPhenatic Apr 10 '22

And likely not at all evolved to infect most everything living. Infectious diseases require a constant co-evolution, cat-and-mouse game

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u/Eldoggomonstro Apr 10 '22

This one is a legit concern that NOBODY is talking about.

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u/coercedaccount2 Apr 10 '22

Economic hardship brought on by demographics. In the developed and developing nations, each generation has been smaller than the last for 60 years now. The boomers are an unusually massive generation, globally. Having so many old people, relative to young people is about to be a massive, global economic drain. We're all about to be poorer for it.

Yes, I know it's good from an ecological perspective and probably good in the long term but it's still going to be rough for the next few decades.

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u/KatakombKidd Apr 11 '22

I work as a prehearing case manager for a disability advocacy firm. Each year it is harder and harder to help people get SSDI or SSI. And even then the monthly stipends are not keeping up with inflation properly. Disabled people are being swept under a rug. It’s absolutely vile.

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u/GdoubleWB Apr 11 '22

Antibiotic resistance is rapidly getting out of hand. If it goes too far, it will be the end of modern medicine as we know it.