r/antiwork Jan 21 '22 Silver 18 Gold 2 Helpful 12 Wholesome 8 Take My Energy 1 This 1 Shocked 1 Take My Power 1

Just got a message from my son’s daycare with their new rates starting March 2022. His rates are going up over $300 a month. I am a single mother and college educated. I also live with my parents to stay afloat. I literally can not afford to work. Sorry if this doesn’t belong here.

Post image
47.1k Upvotes

338

u/awheckyea Jan 21 '22

Opposite end of that - daycare worker! I make $10/hr.

83

u/Square-Stranger6896 Jan 22 '22

$10 an hour is pathetic. I’d walk out. You’d be better off being a private nanny

26

u/awheckyea Jan 22 '22

I've thought about it, but ultimately I've switched jobs seven times in two years and this is the first job where I've ever felt respected and appreciated by a boss. It's ironic considering a tiny one bedroom apt is 900/mo here and $10 (with an extra $300 in govt assistance) is nowhere near enough.

39

u/Square-Stranger6896 Jan 22 '22

What’s ironic? $10 an hour means your employer doesn’t respect you. $10 an hour will maybe let you survive on your own, but def not with a child

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

67

u/aloysius-96 Jan 22 '22

Why is this??? I just found out my daughters teacher makes this much and it breaks my heart. She is such an important part of my child’s life and she is paid like crap—why?!?

27

u/awheckyea Jan 22 '22

Couldn't tell you. In my state, there's an extra $300 bonus in government assistance monthly. Our daycare has about 15 workers; I work with mostly with our babies and toddlers, and we have anywhere between 14-32 of them on any given day (up to 65 kids total). We are getting a pay raise soon because our prices are rising, but wether that's a .25 cent raise or up to an extra $5/hr, I'm not sure. It's a low pay, and sometimes it doesn't feel enough to change diapers, get screamed at and snotted on, but ultimately I do really love the kids and I do like the work. Getting hugged by twenty kids first thing in the morning and getting ran over by excited babies really does help.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

13.0k

u/dominiqlane Jan 21 '22 Silver Helpful Take My Energy This

Insane rates while the people who actually watch and interact with your child makes minimum wage.

6.4k

u/ronwheezy87 Jan 21 '22

yes, (former preschool teacher) lol your teaching staff is seeing NONE of that $$$$

3.9k

u/Larrymentalboy Jan 21 '22

It's basically beneficial to both parties to just hire a preschool teacher as a nanny

3.0k

u/[deleted] Jan 21 '22

I’ve known families with multiple daycare-age children hire a nanny, because it’s cheaper. Or two families pool together to hire a nanny, for the children of both families. Definitely more cost effective for both parties.

948

u/workrelatedstuffs Jan 22 '22

higher quality care too, IMO

377

u/Longjumping-Heart-18 Jan 22 '22

And I love nannying too, it’s easier than working in a preschool for sure.

→ More replies

13

u/Link7369_reddit Jan 22 '22

Compared to the shit tier vetting the daycare does, yes, it is very much still a risk, but at least you have a say.

→ More replies

496

u/AsciiFace Jan 22 '22

My oldest goes to a co-op preschool, basically all the money goes to supplies or the teacher. Parents volunteer time to reduce staffing needs and cost.

202

u/[deleted] Jan 22 '22

[deleted]

→ More replies
→ More replies

225

u/Loki_White Jan 22 '22

Isn't the pooling of resources for childcare supposed to be the whole fucking point of daycare?

As usual, bloated admin staff make everything shit, and contribute no value to the final product/service. It's a disease that's infected every industry.

→ More replies

205

u/ChiefyPoof Jan 22 '22

That’s brilliant. It’s sad that we (Americans) have to come up with work arounds like that just to make sure our children can be cared for. Because, of course both parents work or single parents work and have to figure out child care. The gov wants our population to grow but doesn’t/ takes away any help. This is one of the reasons my husband and I don’t have children.

→ More replies
→ More replies

371

u/SeeYaOnTheRift Jan 21 '22

Even that is pretty unaffordable if you think about it. My parents tried to do the nanny thing for my two younger sisters and my dad ended up having to work 70-80 hours a week to be able to pay the nanny 40k a year with benefits.

They ended up switching to an Au-pair because it’s really the only affordable option. Even that wouldn’t work for most people because you have to have an extra bedroom and bathroom.

39

u/The_Clarence Jan 22 '22

What's common now is shared nannies. Two kids, one nanny, split the cost, alternate homes for care (if schedules align). Still double the attention (most daycares are 1:4 for little ones)

→ More replies

235

u/AshamedGorilla Jan 22 '22 edited Jan 22 '22

We did an Au Pair when we had our second kid. Even with paying a contractor to put up a wall to make a bedroom for them, it was the same cost as daycare for the infant, plus they can also watch the preschooler as needed. It's maybe a little more expensive once you include the cost to feed an extra adult, but once you get past one kid it's definitely a cost savings.

Plus we hired them just as covid shutdown everything. So having the help in-home was great when we had to WFH.

Edit: getting a few comments about how the au pair program is exploitive. The program does indeed have it's flaws, and there are shady people who take advantage of it. We pay our au pair more than the minimum required stipend and treat them like family. Our au pair has definitely heard the bad stories, but we try our best to make them feel welcome and supported.

They agreed to stay for a second year with us and we truly feel like we have actually forged a relationship that will last a lifetime. Plus my kids adore them. Anyway, people don't need to believe me, but i think my wife and I have been fair employers to our au pair (and even better friends). My wife works in childcare herself, so she fully understands the challenges and issues with being a caregiver.

123

u/apple-pie2020 Jan 22 '22

Had an Au pair when I was a kid. She stayed with us for two years and like yours became family. She ended up with her citizenship and 20 years later I had her child in my class at high school. Was an honor to be able to repay her care for me with teaching her son.

15

u/RDLAWME Jan 22 '22

My dutch au pair came to my wedding, 25 years later. He brought his son who was about the same age I was when he stayed with us. The au pair program was an amazing experience for everyone involved.

→ More replies
→ More replies

84

u/johonnamarie Jan 22 '22

Judge down my street does this. She's originally from Romania I think. She sponsors one every year even though her kids can almost drive now. She says she likes to help bring them here, get an education at the local community college and make a difference in their lives. Can be done well.

→ More replies

19

u/elcivicogrande Jan 22 '22

Exactly. And in mass they are now paid 14.25 an hour. Which is still cheaper than daycare for two kids. It’s a great program. People complain the stipend is too low but the 200 a week in other states doesn’t count the fact that all food, transportation, lodging, normal expenses is covered. So it’s more like spending money than a salary.

43

u/ipoopedamuffin Jan 22 '22

My wife was an au pair. She lived out in Texas at first and the family she was with was in the middle of nowhere and starved her. She ended up getting transferred out and they brought in a new au pair. We swore that if we get an au pair, they are getting the guesthouse and we will do everything we can to make sure they are comfortable.

→ More replies
→ More replies

229

u/wanson Jan 22 '22

Nannies (rightfully) want over $20 an hour. There’s no way I can afford that.

→ More replies

133

u/[deleted] Jan 22 '22 edited Mar 15 '22

[deleted]

60

u/WonderfulCattle6234 Jan 22 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

Until there's an accident and a lawsuit.

11

u/xrayphoton Jan 22 '22

Reminds me of Ted from Scrubs

"Say it with me: Accident. Lawsuit."

→ More replies
→ More replies

146

u/SonOfDenny Jan 22 '22 edited Jan 22 '22

We have gone this route. In our area it's $1400-1600 a month for day care. We pay a nanny $1750. She comes to our house and don't have to worry as much about covid and RSV.

Also just want to point out how absurd child care costs are. We are relatively well off, but it has come to a point where we had to discuss my wife not working because her salary goes to child care.

She has a PHD with 250k of student debt.

Edit: I am an idiot she doesn't have a PhD. It's a JD.

63

u/NewtotheCV Jan 22 '22

I looked into running a daycare. There is NO money in it. Rent and regulations cost you 2-3 kids ($3-4K). That leaves 4 kids for salary and taxes ($6000). 7 is max per person in Canada.

So after expenses, I would be making $3500-4000 a month with all the pressures of running a business and working 8-5 without a break.

That leaves no money for activities, food, diapers, etc.

No thanks

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

447

u/RainbowFormation Jan 21 '22

As a former preschool teacher who now has preschool kids of my own, the whole fucking industry is a con. Infant daycare rates in my area are so high I couldn't justify going back to work at all when my oldest was born (I made $18 an hour, and after tax I'd be bringing home $50), and I know the teachers in those rooms are stretched so thin they're barely able to keep the kids alive.

Not to mention that most infant programs are full, so you have to scrounge for any available program and hope there's a spot. I honestly don't know how anyone can make the numbers add up, and I give mad respect to a single parent trying to make it work

63

u/throwyycdude Jan 22 '22

I despise this so much especially since early years is one of the most underpaid and underappreciated fields ever

I’m shocked anyone works in early years anymore

Turnover is so high, bad pay, no resources, toxic work environments, bad benefits, even if you’re the executive director of a non profit you MIGHT make 80k a year end career, crazy parents, children who need more support than you can give, you’re lucky if you get paid vacation, sick time is almost non existent etc

The childcare field is absolutely horrific.

→ More replies

39

u/Justbestrongok Jan 22 '22

And this here is a huge reason lots of companies are struggling to fill lower wage roles, people can’t afford to work

→ More replies

261

u/420madisonave Jan 21 '22 edited Jan 22 '22

That’s why I tell every daycare teacher I meet to look into becoming a private nanny. Most daycares around here charge about the same and pay 11/hr. It’s so ridiculous.

135

u/hysys_whisperer Jan 21 '22

Yeah, if you've got 2 kids, getting a nanny is definitely cheaper than taking them both to day care.

119

u/[deleted] Jan 22 '22

[deleted]

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

256

u/7rj38ej Jan 21 '22

Where does the money go???

501

u/raddits Jan 21 '22

Theres no telling. The owner of my friends daycare at the start of covid wanted the parents to keep paying even though they were closed until further notice. Lmao the parents flipped shit and they rolled it back. They said it was too keep paying the employees but it wasn't a reduced amount or anything. So they wanted all the profits and none of the work. Needless to say they never put their kids back

389

u/hysys_whisperer Jan 21 '22

to keep paying employees

meanwhile, they probably got a PPP loan forgiven for their actual employee costs...

148

u/Savings_Inflation_77 Jan 22 '22

Which ALSO mostly went to the owner's pockets...

41

u/Minion_of_Cthulhu Jan 22 '22

"I'm an employee, too!"

-Owner who never shows up

→ More replies
→ More replies

39

u/Triviajunkie95 Jan 22 '22

Wouldn’t be surprised if they took a PPP loan too.

→ More replies
→ More replies

341

u/Ursula2071 Jan 21 '22

Into the pocket of the owner.

207

u/smartsac Jan 21 '22

Insurance companies too.

→ More replies
→ More replies

112

u/pacific_plywood Jan 22 '22 Helpful

Tbh childcare is just really, really expensive. Unlike almost every other industry there is basically zero room for efficiency improvements. You can't put 30 three year olds in front of 1 twenty year old and expect anything less than mayhem.

A good experiment is to think about a hypothetical where you have several friends with kids the same age as your own, and you want to pool together to get a full-time nanny (ie, low key daycare). How many ways would you need to split, say, $18 an hour (which is decent money for quote unquote unskilled labor in the US) for 40 or 50 hours a week before you could afford it? Now factor in healthcare for that worker, think about the "fee" of having it hosted at someone's house, and it starts to get up there in cost, and you haven't even started to consider stuff like insurance (which is quite significant) that real daycare centers have to cover. (And we aren't even touching the whole, like, incentive to extract profit that many private centers push for).

We're seeing similar issues with elder care in the US, but people give way less of a shit about their grandparents than their toddlers, parental instincts being what they are, so the laws and enforcement of them are much more lax in that arena. In both cases, though, you have a problem -- a responsible person taking care of vulnerable human bodies -- that can't be resolved by SCRUM, or computers, or someone with an MBA. Some people will be better at it and some people will be worse at it but it's gonna be expensive in the end regardless.

All that is to say - it's gonna keep getting shittier until we either start subsidizing workers enough that they'll tolerate garbage pay, or taking over the centers and using public funds to run them at a loss. Stuff like the CTC is an important stopgap but not a permanent solution.

→ More replies
→ More replies

74

u/EODTech87 Jan 21 '22

Hey the preacher needs to afford his giant house somehow.

→ More replies
→ More replies

7.7k

u/Thai_Tai Jan 21 '22

That’s more than my rent

3.4k

u/jnksjdnzmd Jan 21 '22

That's more than my rent with utilities. Lol

2.2k

u/Ender914 Jan 21 '22

That's more than my mortgage. Fun fact - mortgage can be translated in French as "death pledge". Yay!.....?.....

878

u/LastandLeast Jan 21 '22

The price for an infant 5 days a week is literally my mortgage and utilities.

1.2k

u/captain_flak Jan 21 '22

BuT iT’s So SeLfIsH tO nOt HaVe KiDs!

449

u/Chumbo_Malone Jan 22 '22

I have one kid. I would’ve liked a second, but my wife and I did the math - we cannot afford the lifestyle we prefer if we have a second kid.

Anyone that tells people they need to have children deserves to be slapped.

211

u/captain_flak Jan 22 '22

We are in the same boat. Feels like we are hemorrhaging money on a Monthly basis. I feel incredibly fortunate to have a wonderful son, but the expenses are just eye-watering. I don’t really blame people for going child free with costs like these.

33

u/saggytummybubaloo Jan 22 '22

We ended up with twins (naturally) so imagine my surprise and the first thing that comes out of my mouth is "how are we gonna afford this...?"

→ More replies

11

u/unimercy Jan 22 '22

This was my mother in law! I tell her we can’t afford it and she just says back in my day we had them and we made it work, um no thanks I don’t want to suffer and be miserable and not be able to give my children the life they deserve. We barely manage paycheck to pay check and even have to pull from our savings, it’s draining fast I just worry about losing the roof over our head

→ More replies

77

u/pickled-Lime Jan 22 '22

My dad told me this when I was sixteen. He's also an asshat 😂

337

u/shrtnylove Jan 21 '22

I see you, pope Francis! Telling me I’m selfish for treating my dogs like my kids. ;)

136

u/ButIFeelFine Jan 21 '22

Whereas most of the flock (generally speaking) wants to treat the worlds’ kids like dogs.

35

u/imabeecharmer Jan 22 '22

Sounds like humans need to treat both better....

→ More replies

91

u/Mothringer Jan 22 '22

You are. Cats are clearly better.

/s

70

u/[deleted] Jan 22 '22

Found the cat.

52

u/Mothringer Jan 22 '22

No, I'm merely owned by a few, not one myself. I post things they order me to from time to time.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

38

u/orundarkes Jan 21 '22

Mort like death wager but yeah

→ More replies

76

u/rudyjewliani Jan 21 '22

French is such a fun language. Orgasm is translated as "la petit mort", or "little death".

I mean, it makes sense that they use the same word, you know, given that in both scenarios we're getting totally fucked.

→ More replies

78

u/Meandmystudy Jan 21 '22

mortgage can be translated in French as "death pledge".

Amortization means spreading your payments out over time and it also has to do with death in the original usage. Usually anything with the root Latin of "mort" has to do with death.

Bonds in the stock market are also associated with the term bondage, since those who did not pay off their debts would be put in bonds and carted off the debtors prison.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

596

u/rdickeyvii Jan 21 '22

Likely it's more than some of the teachers rent too. Daycare teachers get paid shit. I just hope the price increases go to them and not just the owners.

347

u/[deleted] Jan 21 '22

In my town, daycare workers are paid minimum wage.

168

u/moot17 Jan 21 '22

I process SNAP (food stamp eligibility)--the daycare staff in the county are a constant revolving door of applicants, I can back you up on that.

→ More replies

301

u/rdickeyvii Jan 21 '22

My ex wife had a bachelor's degree in early childhood development (aka teaching prek-5th). She was the highest paid employee at $13/hr iirc. Higher than minimum but lower than most restaurants

121

u/Baby-Calypso Jan 22 '22 edited Jan 22 '22

Yep. Dream job would be to work at a daycare. I’d like to be a teacher and was thinking I’d do daycare as I save for college.. nope. Why would I do that when my upcoming future mall job is paying me up to $5 more an hour then daycares around my area… plus the fact that I’d have to study and pay for classes to even get certified for another $500 (?)

30

u/Delightful_Day Jan 22 '22

Honestly I wish there was some service where a parent could pay, team up with one or two other families for a total max of five kids, and hire a dedicated nanny/sitter.

Think about it. Assume 9 hour days, 5 days a week. That’s 45 hours.

Every parent pays $ 5/hr per kid. That’s $900 month per kid. And $4500 month for the nanny. Or 54k/year

Seems like a livable arrangement for both the parents and the nanny.

Issue of course is added costs of insurance and who knows what else.

Maybe my math is wrong (it could be) but why is this not a business model/a thing?

33

u/Mekisteus HR Manager (Feel free to abuse me or AMA) Jan 22 '22

It is. It's called "in-home daycare" and is pretty common. Most states have laws about the maximum number of kids you can watch at one time, though.

Keep in mind that 54k year income for an independent business owner is not the same as 54k a year for an employee with a wage or salary.

Not only are you paying all the taxes your employer would normally pay yourself, you also have to cover your own health insurance and liability insurance. You'd also have no benefits at all, such as workers' comp, unemployment insurance, 401k, vacation days, sick days, FMLA, etc., etc.

Now throw in that most parents would not be willing to pay full daycare price for an in-home daycare, that you're unable to take any days off without greatly inconveniencing the parents, that you are probably going to be feeding these kids a meal or two a day, that they are going to destroy your house over time, etc.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

67

u/Paid_Redditor Jan 22 '22

I brought this up before and was downvoted to hell, but daycare teachers (IN TEXAS AT LEAST) are often paid less than minimum wage during their “training period”. Which is somehow legal in the state of texas. I know this because it happened to my wife, who has a 4 year degree from a very well known college but sucks at seeing her self worth. After that they’ll be happy to see anything over $12 an hour. Turnover over is incredibly high and state laws are violated almost weekly. I’m not talking about the cheaper ones, even the nice ones (Montessori schools included) with $1000 tuition are the same.

→ More replies

195

u/strothsloth Jan 21 '22

My sister worked at a daycare for eight years at minimum wage and never got a raise. Well that's not quite true; the owner announced that everybody would be getting a raise! $50/mo under the table. She quit.

The happy ending of this story is, Covid fucked the owner and she had to close permanently.

42

u/CeramicMasterpiece Jan 21 '22

Hopefully her boss was reported for breaking the law.

150

u/WayneKrane Jan 21 '22

Yup, I went to school with a girl who has a masters in education now. She works as a daycare worker and makes $11.50 an hour. I was shocked she made so little.

→ More replies
→ More replies

142

u/trimbandit Jan 21 '22

Yah my GF could make the same money she makes as a preschool teacher working at dunkin donuts. Not that there is anything wrong with DD, but she is shaping young minds.

105

u/rdickeyvii Jan 21 '22

Yea it's seriously fucked up, why don't we as a society value the people who are caring for our kids?

71

u/zerombr Jan 22 '22

because corporations haven't found a way to steal money from it. I believe that's the legit answer.

→ More replies

83

u/Eisenstein Jan 22 '22

If I had to guess, it is probably because it is traditionally seen as something women would do, and any job that only would hire women would be seen as something where the money was not the primary income. If it was, well, more reason for the woman to get married.

Along the way, it became profit oriented and no one making money off it is going to change it unless it is demanded, so here we are.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

192

u/yoloswagdon Jan 21 '22

Daycare for my two children is $1280 in Kentucky, and that’s cheaper than the $1600 we were paying before we moved to a small town. My 5 year olds daycare is $200/week. My infant is $120, because he goes to daycare in our small town. His was $200 a week in the city. That’s pretty affordable daycare for our area… literally more than my mortgage

→ More replies

151

u/DustinoHeat Jan 21 '22

And people wonder why people aren’t having kids.

16

u/shmere4 Jan 22 '22

The current projection is that the worlds population will halve in 100 years at the current rate of reproduction. This will be a big problem for a lot of societies as the elderly begin to severely outnumber the working class. The main driver in most countries is the cost of raising a child.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

10.7k

u/schafkj Jan 21 '22 Silver Helpful This Rocket Like

Politicians freaking out over declining birth rates, so instead of subsidizing pregnancy care and childcare they simply ban abortion.

6.8k

u/sheikhyerbouti Come and see the violence inherent in the system! Jan 21 '22 Gold Wholesome All-Seeing Upvote

Without children living in poverty, how else will the military maintain its enlistment rates?

3.9k

u/RickMuffy lazy and proud Jan 21 '22 Silver Gold Helpful

I'm glad you mentioned this, because the two things a lot of us push for in America, universal Healthcare and affordable education, are two of the biggest draws of the military.

1.6k

u/SamSepiol-ER28_0652 Jan 21 '22

If you can limit access to healthcare and education you can keep people poor forever.

→ More replies

582

u/Small-Translator-535 Jan 21 '22

Every friend of mine that went into the military did it for the benefits, and all went the route of office military jobs. They get free schooling of thier choice, free housing, an allowance for food, and the low salary they do make goes right into savings. Everyone can have this, they just want you contractually obliged to shoot someone if they say so.

324

u/destineysunshine Jan 21 '22

Or they just injure you, toss you aside and make you jump through hoops for compensation cause insurance won’t cover these pre-existing injuries

143

u/H-Christ Jan 21 '22

Burn pit? What burn pit? You mean your campfire duty?

65

u/lividash Jan 21 '22

Yeah those acid burns still have scars from when the batteries everyone tossed into the burn pit went boom boom... or whatever it was that went boom and sprayed my arms with hot liquid.

33

u/breakyourfac Jan 22 '22

Or in my case they try to tell me having amoebic dysentery for nearly 6 months straight somehow didn't leave lasting and permanent damage to my gut.

42

u/fightingappletrees Jan 22 '22

You lost your hearing and have no shoulder and no left knee, and can’t work? Uh… 35% disabled for VA coverage. NEXT!

10

u/BillyBones844 Jan 22 '22

My favorite is that you dont even get your eyes or dental covered by the VA unless you are injured during your service and receive disability for them.

→ More replies
→ More replies

98

u/[deleted] Jan 21 '22

Spot. On.

193

u/WonderLorde Jan 21 '22

You are also property in the military, so another plus.

251

u/artemis1860 Jan 21 '22

This line was how they drew me in. “If he touches you again, he goes to jail for damage to government property.”

It’s creepy looking back now at how that sentence once gave me hope…

181

u/Small-Translator-535 Jan 21 '22

That's fucked up. You belong to yourself, remember that. Fuck that guy too.

128

u/artemis1860 Jan 21 '22

Thanks. Tbh need that reminder. Long story but it’s funny how 14 years later something can haunt ya. Anyway, I’m gonna wander off topic but just wanted to say thank you. Simple sentences like that are reminders I still need sometimes. ❤️

→ More replies

80

u/WonderLorde Jan 21 '22

The deepest hole makes the faintest lights bright.

35

u/knifeknifegoose Jan 21 '22

This is so goddamn depressing and amazing and I’m going to remember it forever. Thanks internet stranger,

→ More replies

28

u/bjeebus Jan 21 '22

For sure they'll do something about civilians interfering with military personnel. You might be SOL if "he" is also DOD though.

12

u/SweatyGenitals Jan 21 '22

Random question- I see people using SOL all the time, does it mean Shit Outta Luck? Just curious

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

22

u/Small-Translator-535 Jan 21 '22

Lmao def not advocating for it, I think it's fucked up and proves that we have the capacity to organize benefits like this for everyone.

18

u/WonderLorde Jan 21 '22

Oh I thought so, just another point in showing how the elites want slaves.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

130

u/slytherpuffenclaw Jan 21 '22

As someone who briefly looked at the Army SOLELY as a backup to afford college if I didn't get sufficient scholarship, I feel this.

81

u/JTP1228 Jan 21 '22

As someone who joined the Army, the benefits are awesome, and I think everyone should have them. You shouldn't have to potentially put your life on the line to have free/cheap Healthcare, free education, and better job opportunities

→ More replies
→ More replies

43

u/anonistoner420 Jan 21 '22 edited Jan 29 '22

Ahh yes we will gladly instantly approve 648 billion for the wars, but childcare or healthcare? Mmm let us think about that for a few years or longer.

Edit: 6.48 Trillion

→ More replies

13

u/idriveachickcar Jan 21 '22

Dont forget retirement and scatpacks

→ More replies

70

u/[deleted] Jan 21 '22

It's called the poverty draft for a reason . . .

→ More replies
→ More replies

378

u/PilotEnvironmental46 Jan 21 '22 edited Jan 22 '22

Well it’s always “life is precious” until the day that kid is born then it’s like “not our problem. No food stamps, no welfare for these deadbeats”. Life is precious but it’s okay for kids to be cold, not have enough to eat, and parents making low wages because of anti Union legislation and low minimum wages.

79

u/atypicalgamergirl Jan 22 '22 Wholesome

That’s because the underclass is not much more to them than a herd of ‘human resources’ to keep the money machines chugging.

→ More replies

149

u/infadox Jan 21 '22

This sentence 1000% explains exactly what’s happening so perfectly I wish you had a mic to drop.

→ More replies
→ More replies

3.1k

u/bilboard_bag-inns Jan 21 '22 edited Jan 22 '22

I remember seeing some clip of a movie with a mother trying to get a job as she was running away from an abuser or something and she went to some government office and was like "I need help to get this kid to daycare so I can get a job"

"Well in order to get help you're required to get a job"

"I can't get a job cause I can't get the kid watched over while I'm at work"

"Well then get him daycare"

"I can't get daycare without help"

"then get a job"

edit: y'all why'd I get like 50 reddit notifications from this chill

edit: I now know it is Maid. Thank you to everyone recommending it. It is no longer required for you to say that it is Maid

965

u/missthickbiscuit Jan 22 '22

This is the exact nightmare that I’m living right now.

406

u/[deleted] Jan 22 '22

[deleted]

→ More replies
→ More replies

422

u/PollutionMany4369 Jan 22 '22

I’ve been in this exact scenario and it was awful. I lucked out with a woman I went to HS with who watched kids out of her house. She took my daughter in for $20 a day under the table. Yes that’s insanely cheap but I was making $9.25/hour and had no child support.

128

u/modsarefascists42 Jan 22 '22

That's how most daycares are done where I live. I ended up basically becoming like a brother to the grandson of the lady who owned it. I think official daycare outfits are starting up now but they're absurdly expensive compared to whatever it was that I was at.

→ More replies

293

u/Shepea64 Jan 22 '22

That was Maid on Netflix

→ More replies

141

u/[deleted] Jan 22 '22

[deleted]

19

u/bilboard_bag-inns Jan 22 '22

It was a family member watching and I happened to be in the room for a bit. I'll go ask lol

→ More replies

18

u/Dubya1886 Jan 22 '22

Yeah that’s it. Great show, made me feel so much empathy for the countless people I’m sure are going through a nearly exact scenario rn.

12

u/Busy_Possibility9622 Jan 22 '22

It so does. Loved that show.

→ More replies

216

u/jq4005 Jan 22 '22

In social work - this shit is real. If you want to do some digging, many politicians (moderate and right) believe that making it challenging to get "handouts" is necessary. Paul Ryan has a great quote somewhere from a few years ago. One that shows how ignorant he is to situations folks are going through and how much he doesn't care to really help.

169

u/qholmes98 Jan 22 '22

Almost nobody that complains about the “welfare state” in the US has had to go through the process of getting any kind of assistance. Same is true for immigration for the most part, it’s the natural born citizens who are often the loudest people saying “just become a citizen it’s not that hard”.

60

u/WebNearby5192 Jan 22 '22

Ironically, the people who complain the most about welfare are often some of the first in line to receive it; they’ll get theirs in any way they can and everyone else be damned, even if it’s at their own expense apparently.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

117

u/ruat_caelum Jan 22 '22

Then they shake their heads when people make onlyfans account and pull in $20k a month from the comfort of their own home.

39

u/Cosmic_Dunsparce Jan 22 '22

20k?? A month?????? Brb making an onlyfans

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

1.4k

u/International-Fly467 Jan 21 '22

This is insanity. I’m sorry.

202

u/GrabtharsHamm3r Jan 22 '22 edited Jan 22 '22

So awful. And I doubt the daycare workers are earning the big bucks.

On a side note, ugh. My daycare 3 day rate I’m paying right now is more than the 5 day rate of OP’s daycare. Edit: to add, it’s not a fancy one either. A church based one as well but closest daycare to us with the best hours.

105

u/HungryHungryCamel Jan 22 '22

They aren’t. My coworker and his neighbor both had 2 kids at the same daycare. They hired the director of the daycare as a private nanny for $25/hr plus benefits and each family saved $500/month. She was making $14/hr before.

48

u/multicats Jan 22 '22

I love this approach. Folks need to organize. 👊

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

151

u/crisis_in_the_makin Jan 22 '22

Oddly, this is what I've been paying for my daughter for 4 years now. It's insane.

35

u/johnnybluejeans Jan 22 '22

Yep! When both our kids were in daycare at the same time it was $3200/mo. As each of them moved on to the public school system it was like getting a raise each year.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

2.1k

u/SmootieFakk Jan 21 '22

"A supply fee of $150 per family is due March 1st each year. This fee helps pay for curriculum and supplies for the year."

$150 per family a year to cover curriculum and supplies, so the tuition covers..............????

639

u/[deleted] Jan 21 '22

That totally blew my fucking mind. Wow

330

u/WasabiPeas2 Jan 21 '22

Worked in a daycare for years. All of them charged this. The rates are exorbitant and we made shit.

69

u/Aryk93 Jan 22 '22

Who the fuck is pocketing this money? Like.. I can't imagine the overhead for a daycare being in the tens of thousands of dollars monthly???

24

u/nymphodorka Jan 22 '22

I work in childcare; it goes to insurance. Each child has to be insured for licensing, and insurance can basically charge whatever the hell they want. Rent for our building is not too bad, utilities are manageable, and staff sure as all get out aren't getting paid the big bucks. My boss isn't rich; she's middle class with two incomes to get by. We have to stick to the budget each month.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

1.2k

u/Slamtilt_Windmills Jan 21 '22

Not that it will make you feel any better, but almost certainly none of that money will go to workers

312

u/[deleted] Jan 21 '22 edited Jan 21 '22

[deleted]

→ More replies

109

u/jayzee312 Jan 21 '22

Exactly! Once I get my son out of this daycare I’m going to send them the link to this post so they can read the comments.

→ More replies
→ More replies

3.6k

u/jayzee312 Jan 21 '22 Helpful Wholesome

To be clear this is not a fancy elite daycare it is a local church. The staff doesn’t have any special doctorates or diplomas. This is a typical daycare. I let them know that I will be looking into alternatives.

1.0k

u/YourMomThinksImFunny Jan 21 '22

My wife and I were beyond lucky to find a daycare that works exclusively for teachers kids (my wife is a teacher). It sticks with the local school district calendar so we don't have to pay when my wife isn't working. Also it is a quarter what most places charge, $200 a week per child.

It's honestly the reason my wife hasn't transferred to a better paying district and why I turned down a better paying job that would have made us move.

518

u/-RainbowSkeleton- Jan 21 '22

I couldn’t even afford this.. I don’t know how people manage having families anymore. Ugh.

318

u/YourMomThinksImFunny Jan 21 '22

Dual income and living close to both our parents for babysitting help. Last year we paid $15,000 in child care for our two kids.

116

u/Antisera Jan 21 '22

Having helpful relatives is definitely a boon. I've been caring for an infant on a "pay what you can" basis. The parents couldn't afford any daycare options and also couldn't afford for one of them to stay home. Rent in our area is bleeding them dry but the housing market is shot. There's just no winning.

47

u/eslteachyo Jan 21 '22

Grandparents are often working, sick or don't want to help. I know I never had any help

27

u/Antisera Jan 21 '22

I didn't either, and I wasn't in a position to be able to help my own sister when she needed it as well. It makes me sad that growth can often completely depend on random availability of family - who also needs to work for an income to make ends meet.

→ More replies

33

u/FromTheOR Jan 21 '22

Yeah. Same. 18k for 1 kid. & still need family. Dual income doing pretty well. Still need a budget & a responsible lifestyle.

→ More replies

26

u/deathOfTheGunslinger Jan 21 '22

Working second or third shift. My wife is a teacher and I worked a full time 3 day shift that was Friday night to Monday morning 27 hours a week. No differential instead we worked shortened hours. I got lucky as there was high demand for my position in those hours but others I know just did the regular second or third shift.

→ More replies

142

u/CapJackONeill Jan 21 '22

Here in Quebec, we have subzidized daycare that cost 7$ A DAY! Even more, studies shows that it's actually profitable for the state considering the increased revenue in taxes.

Good luck Americans.

26

u/wellifitisntmee Jan 22 '22

More Americans need to read the Nordic theory of everything book to find out how truly fucked we are.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

229

u/Sweetcynic36 Jan 21 '22

I had the best luck with a teacher/mom who had 3 kids and figured out that running her own home daycare/preschool worked better than paying for 3 young children. It was a bit more than most of the home daycares but well worth it.

→ More replies

157

u/flyleafet9 Jan 21 '22

Bet they pay pennies over minimum wage and/or utilize volunteers in the daycare.

I hate the exploitation of child educators with a passion.

→ More replies

365

u/KruxAF Jan 21 '22

Holy fuck. A church? Man fuck these types of establishments that do that. Jesus would slap they ass

167

u/waitingfordeathhbu idle Jan 21 '22 edited Jan 22 '22

IT’S FOR A CHURCH, HONEY!

16

u/Haikuheathen Jan 22 '22

I love this, and it's probably over 6 years old now. Every time.. I love it!

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

137

u/expat_germany Jan 21 '22

Worst part is churches don't pay taxes.

84

u/jayzee312 Jan 21 '22

I didn’t even think of that. Any church with a daycare attached is a for profit organization

19

u/CrasyMike Jan 21 '22

The church doesn't have to be. The typically run them as seperate organizations, one for-profit, the other not.

→ More replies
→ More replies

174

u/c00lgirlstella Jan 21 '22

Church daycares are such a grift. I have had 2 close friends that have worked with daycare kids at a local church and the cost is not worth the money in their opinion. One friend actually became pregnant and even though she was hurting, had to keep working full time there so theyd give her half off childcare for her own baby. Absolutely mental.

66

u/notnotwho Jan 21 '22

You just have no Real idea. Narcissistic Sociopaths run religious daycare/schools. They deliberately seek out the vulnerable(mostly women), 'train em up' "in the church", then guilt them into "giving-ness". They even curate kids to go to school and get certified to teach, so they can work through(for the church) and then Work when graduated, often at WAY under market rate. They "build" their own ecosystem between them, and only bring in 'outsiders' to keep oversight boards happy. Then proceed to ice them out if they don't fit in. The emotional and spiritual manipulation is Off The Charts, for real.

And let's not forget the likelihood that they are 'tithing', on top of mostly buying their own supplies.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

732

u/_SwiftDeath Jan 21 '22 Silver

As a single man who very well may never have children, I can say with certainty that childcare costs are very much a part of the current issues us workers are facing that anti work is about.

Childcare, student loans and housing costs have not just gone up, they have exploded upward at an entirely unsustainable rate.

This is why middle class and lower Americans are not having kids, we simply cannot afford them.

Personally I think we need more than them just being subsidized. I feel like the government needs to set policies and step in as the costs are clearly getting to unsustainable levels

55

u/Nautis Jan 22 '22

As a young, single, childless man who was fortunate enough to land a job that allowed me to pay off my student loans early and buy a house, it's still well past time for the government to step in and do something about the financial inequality that's been steadily getting worse for the past 50 years. This shit's anxiety inducing just to watch. It feels like everyone else in my generation is drowning in slow motion. We need another New Deal.

→ More replies
→ More replies

339

u/toastandtacos Jan 21 '22

This is exactly why I go OFF on people who tell me that if I "keep waiting for the right time to have kids, it will never come."

Like, FINE. Have you seen the economy? I'd rather not have kids than have to stress and worry about this sort of thing.

86

u/supperdenner Jan 21 '22

There’s nothing wrong with having this stance, in fact it’s smart as hell. Don’t ever let anyone bully you into thinking otherwise.

42

u/toastandtacos Jan 21 '22

Thank you. Just feels like common sense to me

→ More replies

29

u/UzukiCheverie Jan 22 '22

It's insane how boomers and gen x'ers will point fingers at millennials for not having children, but seriously, in this economy??? News flash, if aspiring parents can't afford to have children, then that's gonna decide for them that they're not having children. I don't understand how so many people and organizations just flat out don't get this. It's not always a matter of whether you want children, it's a matter of whether you can and that means a lot more than just being able to conceive.

→ More replies

11

u/Impossible-Pack-6123 Jan 22 '22

I skipped having kids and it’s the best decision I’ve ever made. Not only do I not have to deal with these insane daycare prices, but I can sleep more and do whatever I want. As much as all of the other moms want me to regret it, I don’t. Child free people are much more common now!

→ More replies
→ More replies

1.3k

u/crabby_cat_lady Jan 21 '22

It absolutely does belong here. Childcare should be heavily subsidized in the US.

582

u/jayzee312 Jan 21 '22

You’re absolutely right it should. I’m hijacking your top comment to say that I’m in Indiana where cost of living is considered relatively affordable.

54

u/Nearby-Listen-8082 Jan 21 '22

I’m in Indiana too! It’s getting pretty ridiculous here with housing but then i look at rural towns down south n see worse. I don’t understand it. It’s set up to where both parents have to work but childcare is so expensive

→ More replies

116

u/DissolutionedChemist Jan 21 '22

Yes this 100% belongs here.

93

u/Zealousideal-Feed156 SocDem Jan 21 '22 edited Jan 22 '22 Helpful

I showed up here mostly just to fight with anybody who tried to say the issue of childcare isn’t related to antiwork.

Edit: thanks for the award! Parents, we support you!!!

→ More replies
→ More replies

57

u/TAR_TWoP Jan 21 '22

It should be a public service in the U.S., like it is where I live. Because if benefits the society to have kids receive a solid education and care in their early age, regardless of their parents money, knowledge, or abilities.

30

u/KashEsq Jan 21 '22

It used to be during and for a short while after WW2, but then the program got cancelled once non-white people started using it.

As usual, we can't have nice things in this country because of racism.

→ More replies
→ More replies

105

u/epithet_grey Jan 21 '22

So if I worked full time, and I had an infant, my childcare bill would be considerably more than the mortgage on my modest ranch on the outskirts of a medium-sized urban area.

That’s sustainable (said no one making under $100k/year).

→ More replies

194

u/Ok_Image6174 Jan 21 '22

This is exactly why I was a SAHM for 5.5yrs and did at home babysitting to earn money. Even now, I only work weekends so that my husband can be with the kids and I am home M-F because no way could we afford childcare.

83

u/Neither-Magazine9096 Jan 21 '22

That’s what’s happening with us. Currently on maternity leave, did the math and We would be paying daycare more than what I make. Tried to turn my resignation in to my boss, who told me to look again if there was anything they could do. Seriously would have to double my salary to make it worth it with taxes

→ More replies

31

u/Guyote_ Jan 22 '22

Imagine being a single mother/father in this same situation.

This is why people have trouble getting out of abusive relationships, also. And, it is why I loathe conservatives so fucking much. They enable the poor conditions of society to fester and, when that happens, people suffer. I am so fucking sick of it.

→ More replies

209

u/BeverlyHills70117 Jan 21 '22

And the pay of the daycare workers is disgraceful.

It's why I went full anti-work and became a stay at home dad. Couldn't be part of that system, I'd rather take the hit and enjoy my toddlers childhood.

→ More replies

112

u/Sweetcynic36 Jan 21 '22

And yet they pay their workers very poorly. Go figure.

57

u/Addie0o Jan 21 '22

I made 9.50/ hour as a daycare instructor. I constantly had them trying to over fill classes to the point the teachers would report to state authorities. Nothing was every looked into.

→ More replies
→ More replies

96

u/roberto151st Jan 21 '22

this why I work night shift and my wife works the morning shift so we don't have to pay for these crazy ass expensive day care costs, they literally be charging more then the average makes or pretty much the whole person's check smh

19

u/here-to-lurknsfw Jan 22 '22

If you work night shift and are presumably up all night then come home and watch the kids all day...when do you sleep?

19

u/[deleted] Jan 22 '22

[deleted]

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

58

u/livingfortheliquid Jan 21 '22

There was a part of the build back better plan that Joe Manchin and the GOP killed that would have addressed this. There are hopes to include daycare help for Americans in future bills.

→ More replies

44

u/[deleted] Jan 21 '22

Government want more people to have kids yet one income isn't enough anymore and childcare costs are through the roof and then they're surprised when people don't want kids and population declines.

→ More replies

190

u/LazyZealot9428 Jan 21 '22

It is outrageous that childcare isn’t subsidized in this country. It’s every family for themselves. I’m sorry this is happening to you.

→ More replies

58

u/[deleted] Jan 21 '22

My child went from 225 a week to 250 a week and we get a generous discount of $5 once she hits the next age group. It's officially passed our mortgage for highest monthly expense.

→ More replies

95

u/RentalDildos Jan 21 '22

Not subsidizing pre-k is such a fucking evil part about this country. These kids suffer more than anyone in the end

→ More replies

93

u/RevolutionaryKiwi381 Jan 21 '22

I live in Canada. For me to send two kids is anywhere upwards past 60$ a day.

As a person who can only find part time minimum wage jobs, I'm stuck at home.

The system is working exactly as planned. 😔

→ More replies

108

u/saltysanders Jan 21 '22

Dumb question - you're saying it's daycare, but they're saying "tuition." Is that their bullshit fancy way of saying daycare to justify higher prices?

(and yes it belongs here. Both because childcare workers are undervalued and underpaid, and because the high costs of childcare are an obstacle to parents working)

48

u/aow80 Jan 21 '22

Yes at all daycares the caregivers are teachers and the daycare is “school”. A lot of caregivers actually have education degrees so it’s a sop to them.

→ More replies

26

u/SpreadsheetJockey227 Jan 21 '22

When my kids were in daycare it was also called tuition. I wouldn't read too far into that part.

→ More replies

73

u/jayzee312 Jan 21 '22

Yeah it’s just a church daycare not a private school or anything .

→ More replies
→ More replies